SUNFLOWER SEEDS
Nutrient DRI/DV

Vitamin E            82%

Copper                 70%

 Vitamin B1         43.3%

Manganese        34%

Selenium            33.7%

 Phosphorus       33%

Magnesium        28.4%

Vitamin B6          27.6%

 Folate                  19.8%

Vitamin B3          18.2%

 

 



Health Benefits
The World’s Healthiest Foods website, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=57#nutritionalprofile,  shares that Sunflower seeds will take care of your hunger, while also enhancing your health by supplying significant amounts of vitamin E, magnesium and selenium.


Anti-Inflammatory and Cardiovascular Benefits from Sunflower Seeds' Vitamin E

Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E, the body's primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing free radicals that would otherwise damage fat-containing structures and molecules, such as cell membranes, brain cells, and cholesterol. By protecting these cellular and molecular components, vitamin E has significant anti-inflammatory effects that result in the reduction of symptoms in asthma, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, conditions where free radicals and inflammation play a big role. Vitamin E has also been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, help decrease the severity and frequency of hot flashes in women going through menopause, and help reduce the development of diabetic complications.

In addition, vitamin E plays an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E is one of the main antioxidants found in cholesterol particles and helps prevent free radicals from oxidizing cholesterol. Only after it has been oxidized is cholesterol able to adhere to blood vessel walls and initiate the process of atherosclerosis, which can lead to blocked arteries, heart attack, or stroke. Getting plenty of vitamin E can significantly reduce the risk of developing atherosclerosis. In fact, studies show that people who get a good amount of vitamin E are at a much lower risk of dying of a heart attack than people whose dietary intake of vitamin E is marginal or inadequate.


Sunflower Seeds' Phytosterols Lower Cholesterol

Phytosterols are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure very similar to cholesterol, and when present in the diet in sufficient amounts, are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease risk of certain cancers.

Phytosterols beneficial effects are so dramatic that they have been extracted from soybean, corn, and pine tree oil and added to processed foods, such as "butter"-replacement spreads, which are then touted as cholesterol-lowering "foods." But why settle for an imitation "butter" when Mother Nature's nuts and seeds are a naturally rich source of phytosterols—and cardio-protective fiber, minerals and healthy fats as well?

In a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers published the amounts of phytosterols present in nuts and seeds commonly eaten in the United States.

Sesame seeds had the highest total phytosterol content (400-413 mg per 100 grams), and English walnuts and Brazil nuts the lowest (113 mg/100grams and 95 mg/100 grams). (100 grams is equivalent to 3.5 ounces.) Of the nuts and seeds typically consumed as snack foods, sunflower seeds and pistachios were richest in phytosterols (270-289 mg/100 g), followed by pumpkin seeds (265 mg/100 g).


Calm Your Nerves, Muscles and Blood Vessels with Sunflower Seeds' Magnesium

Sunflower seeds are a good source of magnesium. Numerous studies have demonstrated that magnesium helps reduce the severity of asthma, lower high blood pressure, and prevent migraine headaches, as well as reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Magnesium is also necessary for healthy bones and energy production. About two-thirds of the magnesium in the human body is found in our bones. Some helps give bones their physical structure, while the rest is found on the surface of the bone where it is stored for the body to draw upon as needed.

Magnesium counterbalances calcium, thus helping to regulate nerve and muscle tone. In many nerve cells, magnesium serves as Nature's own calcium channel blocker, preventing calcium from rushing into the nerve cell and activating the nerve. By blocking calcium's entry, magnesium keeps our nerves (and the blood vessels and muscles they ennervate) relaxed. If our diet provides us with too little magnesium, however, calcium can gain free entry, and the nerve cell can become overactivated, sending too many messages and causing excessive contraction. Insufficient magnesium can thus contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms (including spasms of the heart muscle or the spasms of the airways symptomatic of asthma), and migraine headaches, as well as muscle cramps, tension, soreness and fatigue.


Improved Detoxification and Cancer Prevention from Sunflower Seeds' Selenium

Sunflower seeds are also a good source of selenium, a trace mineral that is of fundamental importance to human health. Accumulated evidence from prospective studies, intervention trials and studies on animal models of cancer has suggested a strong inverse correlation between selenium intake and cancer incidence. Selenium has been shown to induce DNA repair and synthesis in damaged cells, to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, and to induce their apoptosis, the self-destruct sequence the body uses to eliminate worn out or abnormal cells.

In addition, selenium is incorporated at the active site of many proteins, including glutathione peroxidase, which is particularly important for cancer protection. One of the body's most powerful antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase is used in the liver to detoxify a wide range of potentially harmful molecules. When levels of glutathione peroxidase are too low, these toxic molecules are not disarmed and wreak havoc on any cells with which they come in contact, damaging their cellular DNA and promoting the development of cancer cells. Its selenium richness is another reason that sunflower seeds can make a good snack.


Description

Sunflower seeds are the gift of the beautiful sunflower, a plant with rays of petals emanating from its bright yellow, seed-studded center. The sunflower's Latin scientific name, Helianthus annuus, reflects its solar appearance since helios is the Greek word for sun, and anthos is the Greek word for flower.

The sunflower produces grayish-green or black seeds encased in tear-dropped shaped gray or black shells that oftentimes feature black and white stripes. Since these seeds have a very high oil content, they are one of the main sources used to produce polyunsaturated oil. Shelled sunflower seeds have a mild nutty taste and firm, but tender texture. Their taste is oftentimes compared with the Jerusalem artichoke (not to be confused with the bulb artichoke), another member of the Helianthus family.


History

While sunflowers are thought to have originated in Mexico and Peru, they are one of the first plants to ever be cultivated in the United States. They have been used for more than 5,000 years by the Native Americans, who not only used the seeds as a food and an oil source, but also used the flowers, roots and stems for varied purposes including as a dye pigment. The Spanish explorers brought sunflowers back to Europe, and after being first grown in Spain, they were subsequently introduced to other neighboring countries. Currently, sunflower oil is one of the most popular oils in the world. Today, the leading commercial producers of sunflower seeds include the Russian Federation, Peru, Argentina, Spain, France and China.


How to Select and Store

Sunflower seeds are sold either shelled or unshelled and are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the sunflower seeds are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure the seeds' maximal freshness.

When purchasing unshelled seeds, make sure that the shells are not broken or dirty. Additionally, they should be firm and not have a limp texture. When purchasing shelled seeds, avoid those that appear yellowish in color as they have probably gone rancid. In addition, if you are purchasing sunflower seeds from a bulk bin, smell them to ensure that they are still fresh and have not spoiled.

Since sunflower seeds have a high fat content and are prone to rancidity, it is best to store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They can also be stored in the freezer since the cold temperature will not greatly affect their texture or flavor.


Individual Concerns

Sunflower seeds are not a commonly allergenic food and are not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates or purines.


Nutritional Profile

Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E and a very good source of copper and vitamin B1.. In addition, sunflower seeds are a good source of manganese, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin B6, folate, and niacin.
For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: Sunflower seeds.


In-Depth Nutritional Profile

In addition to the nutrients highlighted in our ratings chart, an in-depth nutritional profile for Sunflower seeds is also available. This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and more.


Introduction to Food Rating System Chart
In order to better help you identify foods that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Food Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the foods that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which this food is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the food doesn't contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this food's in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients - not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good - please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you'll need to glance up in the top left corner where you will find the name of the food and the serving size we used to calculate the food's nutrient composition. This serving size will tell you how much of the food you need to eat to obtain the amount of nutrients found in the chart. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this food and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling." 

Read more background information and details of our rating system

Sunflower Seeds, dried
0.25 cup
35.00 grams

Calories: 204
GI: 
low

Nutrient

Amount

DRI/DV
(%)

Nutrient
Density

World's Healthiest
Foods Rating

vitamin E

12.31 mg (ATE)

82.1

7.2

excellent

copper

0.63 mg

70.0

6.2

very good

vitamin B1

0.52 mg

43.3

3.8

very good

manganese

0.68 mg

34.0

3.0

good

selenium

18.55 mcg

33.7

3.0

good

phosphorus

231.00 mg

33.0

2.9

good

magnesium

113.75 mg

28.4

2.5

good

vitamin B6

0.47 mg

27.6

2.4

good

folate

79.45 mcg

19.9

1.7

good

vitamin B3

2.92 mg

18.2

1.6

good

World's Healthiest
Foods Rating

Rule

excellent

DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%

very good

DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%

good

DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%

In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Sunflower seeds


References

BROWN RICE

In some parts of the world, the word "to eat" literally means "to eat rice." All varieties of rice are available throughout the year, supplying as much as half of the daily calories for half of the world's population.
The process that produces brown rice removes only the outermost layer, the hull, of the rice kernel and is the least damaging to its nutritional value. The complete milling and polishing that converts brown rice into white rice destroys 67% of the vitamin B3, 80% of the vitamin B1, 90% of the vitamin B6, half of the manganese, half of the phosphorus, 60% of the iron, and all of the dietary fiber and essential fatty acids. Fully milled and polished white rice is required to be "enriched" with vitamins B1, B3 and iron.

Nutrient DRI/DV

Manganese                                         88%

Selenium                                             34.7%

Phosphorus                                        23.1%

Copper                                               21.1%

Magnesium                                         20.9%

Vitamin B3                                          18.6%


Health Benefits

Why Brown--But Not White--Rice is One of the World's Healthiest Foods
The difference between brown rice and white rice is not just color! A whole grain of rice has several layers. Only the outermost layer, the hull, is removed to produce what we call brown rice. This process is the least damaging to the nutritional value of the rice and avoids the unnecessary loss of nutrients that occurs with further processing. If brown rice is further milled to remove the bran and most of the germ layer, the result is a whiter rice, but also a rice that has lost many more nutrients. At this point, however, the rice is still unpolished, and it takes polishing to produce the white rice we are used to seeing. Polishing removes the aleurone layer of the grain--a layer filled with health-supportive, essential fats. Because these fats, once exposed to air by the refining process, are highly susceptible to oxidation, this layer is removed to extend the shelf life of the product. The resulting white rice is simply a refined starch that is largely bereft of its original nutrients.

Our food ranking system qualified brown rice as an excellent source of manganese, and a good source of selenium, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, and niacin (vitamin B3). The complete milling and polishing that converts brown rice into white rice destroys 67% of the vitamin B3, 80% of the vitamin B1, 90% of the vitamin B6, half of the manganese, half of the phosphorus, 60% of the iron, and all of the dietary fiber and essential fatty acids. By law in the United States, fully milled and polished white rice must be "enriched" with vitamins B1, B3, and iron. But the form of these nutrients when added back into the processed rice is not the same as in the original unprocessed version, and at least 11 lost nutrients are not replaced in any form even with rice "enrichment."

Here are some of the ways in which the nutrients supplied by brown rice can make an important difference in your health:


Manganese—Energy Production Plus Antioxidant Protection
Manganese helps produce energy from protein and carbohydrates and is involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, which are important for a healthy nervous system, and in the production of cholesterol, which is used by the body to produce sex hormones. Manganese is also a critical component of a very important antioxidant enzyme called superoxide dismutase.Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is found inside the body's mitochondria (the oxygen-based energy factories inside most of our cells) where it provides protection against damage from the free radicals produced during energy production.


Women Who Eat Whole Grains Weigh Less
A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition underscores the importance of choosing whole grains such as brown rice rather than refined grain, i.e., white rice, to maintain a healthy body weight. In this Harvard Medical School / Brigham and Women's Hospital study, which collected data on over 74,000 female nurses aged 38-63 years over a 12 year period, weight gain was inversely associated with the intake of high-fiber, whole-grain foods but positively related to the intake of refined-grain foods. Not only did women who consumed more whole grains consistently weigh less than those who ate less of these fiber-rich foods, but those consuming the most dietary fiber from whole grains were 49% less likely to gain weight compared to those eating foods made from refined grains.


Brown Rice is Rich in Fiber and Selenium
For people worried about colon cancer risk, brown rice packs a double punch by being a concentrated source of the fiber needed to minimize the amount of time cancer-causing substances spend in contact with colon cells, and being a good source of selenium, a trace mineral that has been shown to substantially reduce the risk of colon cancer.

Selenium is an essential component of several major metabolic pathways, including thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems, and immune function. Accumulated evidence from prospective studies, intervention trials and studies on animal models of cancer has suggested a strong inverse correlation between selenium intake and cancer incidence. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the cancer-preventive activities of selenium. Selenium has been shown to induce DNA repair and synthesis in damaged cells, to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, and to induce their apoptosis, the self-destruct sequence the body uses to eliminate worn out or abnormal cells.

In addition, selenium is incorporated at the active site of many proteins, including glutathione peroxidase, which is particularly important for cancer protection. One of the body's most powerful antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase is used in the liver to detoxify a wide range of potentially harmful molecules. When levels of glutathione peroxidase are too low, these toxic molecules are not disarmed and wreak havoc on any cells with which they come in contact, damaging their cellular DNA and promoting the development of cancer cells.

Not only does selenium play a critical role in cancer prevention as a cofactor of glutathione peroxidase, selenium also works with vitamin E in numerous other vital antioxidant systems throughout the body. These powerful antioxidant actions make selenium helpful in the prevention not only of cancer, but also of heart disease, and for decreasing the symptoms of asthma and the pain and inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis.


Lower Cholesterol with Whole Brown Rice
Here's yet another reason to rely on whole foods, such as brown rice, for your healthy way of eating. The oil in whole brown rice lowers cholesterol.

When Marlene Most and colleagues from Louisiana State University evaluated the effects of rice bran and rice bran oil on cholesterol levels in volunteers with moderately elevated cholesterol levels, they found that rice bran oil lowered their LDL (bad) cholesterol.

The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, was divided into two parts. First, 26 subjects ate a diet including 13-22g of dietary fiber each day for three weeks, after which 13 switched to a diet that added defatted rice bran to double their fiber intake for five weeks. In the second part of the study, a randomized crossover trial, 14 subjects ate a diet with rice bran oil for 10 weeks.

While the diet including only defatted rice bran did not lower cholesterol, the one containing rice bran oil lowered LDL cholesterol by 7%. Since all the diets contained similar fatty acids, the researchers concluded that the reduction in cholesterol seen in those receiving rice bran oil must have been due to other constituents such as the unsaponifiable compounds found in rice bran oil. The scientists suggest that the unsaponifiables present in rice bran oil could become important functional foods for cardiovascular health. But why extract just one beneficial compound from brown rice when you can reap all the cardioprotective benefits supplied by the matrix of nutrients naturally present in this delicious whole food? In addition to unsaponifiables, this whole grain also supplies hefty doses of heart-healthy fiber, magnesium, and B vitamins.


Significant Cardiovascular Benefits for Postmenopausal Women
Eating a serving of whole grains, such as brown rice, at least 6 times each week is an especially good idea for postmenopausal women with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or other signs of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

A 3-year prospective study of over 200 postmenopausal women with CVD, published in the American Heart Journal, shows that those eating at least 6 servings of whole grains each week experienced both:

The women's intake of fiber from fruits, vegetables and refined grains was not associated with a lessening in CVD progression.


Phytonutrients with Health-Promoting Activity Equal to or Even Higher than that of Vegetables and Fruits
Research reported at the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) International Conference on Food, Nutrition and Cancer, by Rui Hai Liu, M.D., Ph.D., and his colleagues at Cornell University shows that whole grains, such as rice, contain many powerful phytonutrients whose activity has gone unrecognized because research methods have overlooked them.

Despite the fact that for years researchers have been measuring the antioxidant power of a wide array of phytonutrients, they have typically measured only the "free" forms of these substances, which dissolve quickly and are immediately absorbed into the bloodstream. They have not looked at the "bound" forms, which are attached to the walls of plant cells and must be released by intestinal bacteria during digestion before they can be absorbed.

Phenolics, powerful antioxidants that work in multiple ways to prevent disease, are one major class of phytonutrients that have been widely studied. Included in this broad category are such compounds as quercetin, curcumin, ellagic acid, catechins, and many others that appear frequently in the health news.

When Dr. Liu and his colleagues measured the relative amounts of phenolics, and whether they were present in bound or free form, in common fruits and vegetables like apples, red grapes, broccoli and spinach, they found that phenolics in the "free" form averaged 76% of the total number of phenolics in these foods. In whole grains, however, "free" phenolics accounted for less than 1% of the total, while the remaining 99% were in "bound" form.

In his presentation, Dr. Liu explained that because researchers have examined whole grains with the same process used to measure antioxidants in vegetables and fruits—looking for their content of "free" phenolics"—the amount and activity of antioxidants in whole grains has been vastly underestimated.

Despite the differences in fruits', vegetables' and whole grains' content of "free" and "bound" phenolics, the total antioxidant activity in all three types of whole foods is similar, according to Dr. Liu's research. His team measured the antioxidant activity of various foods, assigning each a rating based on a formula (micromoles of vitamin C equivalent per gram). Broccoli and spinach measured 80 and 81, respectively; apple and banana measured 98 and 65; and of the whole grains tested, corn measured 181, whole wheat 77, oats 75, and brown rice 56.

Dr. Liu's findings may help explain why studies have shown that populations eating diets high in fiber-rich whole grains consistently have lower risk for colon cancer, yet short-term clinical trials that have focused on fiber alone in lowering colon cancer risk, often to the point of giving subjects isolated fiber supplements, yield inconsistent results. The explanation is most likely that these studies have not taken into account the interactive effects of all the nutrients in whole grains—not just their fiber, but also their many phytonutrients. As far as whole grains are concerned, Dr. Liu believes that the key to their powerful cancer-fighting potential is precisely their wholeness. A grain of whole wheat consists of three parts—its endosperm (starch), bran and germ. When wheat—or any whole grain—is refined, its bran and germ are removed. Although these two parts make up only 15-17% of the grain's weight, they contain 83% of its phenolics. Dr. Liu says his recent findings on the antioxidant content of whole grains reinforce the message that a variety of foods should be eaten good health. "Different plant foods have different phytochemicals,"he said. "These substances go to different organs, tissues and cells, where they perform different functions. What your body needs to ward off disease is this synergistic effect—this teamwork—that is produced by eating a wide variety of plant foods, including whole grains."


Lignans Protect against Heart Disease
One type of phytonutrient especially abundant in whole grains including brown rice are plant lignans, which are converted by friendly flora in our intestines into mammalian lignans, including one called enterolactone that is thought to protect against breast and other hormone-dependent cancers as well as heart disease. In addition to whole grains, nuts, seeds and berries are rich sources of plant lignans, and vegetables, fruits, and beverages such as coffee, tea and wine also contain some. When blood levels of enterolactone were measured in over 850 postmenopausal women in a Danish study published in the Journal of Nutrition, women eating the most whole grains were found to have significantly higher blood levels of this protective lignan. Women who ate more cabbage and leafy vegetables also had higher enterolactone levels.


Reduce Your Risk of Metabolic Syndrome
First we were told, "Don't eat fat, and you'll stay trim." After following this advice only to see obesity expand to never before seen proportions, we're told by the food gurus, "Eating fat is fine. Shun carbohydrates to stay slim."

In our opinion, neither piece of dietary advice is complete, accurate or likely to help us stay slim or healthy. Just as different kinds of fats have different effects in our bodies (e.g., saturated and trans fats are linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease while omega-3 fats decrease cardiovascular disease risk), some carbohydrates, such as whole grains, are healthful while others, such as refined grains and the foods made from them, are not.

The latest research is clearly supporting this vital distinction. Refined grains and the foods made from them (e.g., white breads, cookies, pastries, pasta and rice) are now being linked not only to weight gain but to increased risk of insulin resistance (the precursor of type 2 diabetes) and the metabolic syndrome (a strong predictor of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease), while eating more wholegrain foods is being shown to protect against all these ills. Common features of the metabolic syndrome include visceral obesity (the "apple shaped" body), low levels of protective HDL cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure.
In one of the most recent studies, which appeared in Diabetes Care, researchers who analyzed data on over 2,800 participants in the Framingham Offspring Study, found that the prevalence of both insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome was significantly lower among those eating the most cereal fiber from whole grains compared to those eating the least.

Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 38% lower among those with the highest intake of fiber from whole grains. Conversely, study subjects whose diets had the highest glycemic index and glycemic load, both of which are typically low in whole foods and high in processed refined foods, were 141% more likely to have the metabolic syndrome compared to those whose diets had the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load. In other words, compared to those whose diets were primarily composed of whole high fiber foods: whole grains, legumes, vegetables and fruits.

The researchers concluded, "Given that both a high cereal fiber content and lower glycemic index are attributes of wholegrain foods, recommendation to increase wholegrain intake may reduce the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome." Our perspective at the World's Healthiest Foods is that a way of eating that relies on the healthiest foods from all the food groups—the whole foods that contain the healthiest fats, carbohydrates and proteins—is the most effective, intelligent, and most enjoyable way to not only lower your risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, but to stay slim, vital and attractive throughout a long and healthy life.


Brown Rice and Other Whole Grains Substantially Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Brown rice and other whole grains are a rich source of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion.

The FDA permits foods that contain at least 51% whole grains by weight (and are also low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol) to display a health claim stating consumption is linked to lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Now, research suggests regular consumption of whole grains also reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. (van Dam RM, Hu FB, Diabetes Care).

In this 8-year trial, involving 41,186 particpants of the Black Women's Health Study, research data confirmed inverse associations between magnesium, calcium and major food sources in relation to type 2 diabetes that had already been reported in predominantly white populations.

Risk of type 2 diabetes was 31% lower in black women who frequently ate whole grains compared to those eating the least of these magnesium-rich foods. When the women's dietary intake of magnesium intake was considered by itself, a beneficial, but lesser—19%— reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes was found, indicating that whole grains offer special benefits in promoting healthy blood sugar control. Daily consumption of low-fat dairy foods was also helpful, lowering risk of type 2 diabetes by 13%. Rice pudding—quickly made by simply adding low-fat milk, cinnamon, raisins, a little honey and 1/4 teaspoon of finely grated orange peel to a cup of cooked rice, then cooking over medium heat for 5 minutes—is a delicious way to enjoy both rice and dairy.


Tune Down and Bone Up on Brown Rice
Magnesium, another nutrient for which brown rice is a good source, has been shown in studies to be helpful for reducing the severity of asthma, lowering high blood pressure, reducing the frequency of migraine headaches, and reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. How does magnesium accomplish all this? Magnesium helps regulate nerve and muscle tone by balancing the action of calcium. In many nerve cells, magnesium serves as Nature's own calcium channel blocker, preventing calcium from rushing into the nerve cell and activating the nerve. By blocking calcium's entry, magnesium keeps our nerves (and the blood vessels and muscles they ennervate) relaxed. If our diet provides us with too little magnesium, however, calcium can gain free entry, and nerve cells can become overactivated, sending too many messages and causing excessive contraction. Insufficient magnesium can thus contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms (including spasms of the heart muscle or the spasms of the airways symptomatic of asthma), and migraine headaches, as well as muscle cramps, tension, soreness and fatigue.

But that's far from all magnesium does for you. Magnesium, as well as calcium, is necessary for healthy bones. About two-thirds of the magnesium in the human body is found in our bones. Some helps give bones their physical structure, while the rest is found on the surface of the bone where it is stored for the body to draw upon as needed. Brown rice can help you keep those storage sites replenished and ready to meet your body's needs.

In addition to the niacin it supplies, brown rice may also help raise blood levels of nitric oxide, a small molecule known to improve blood vessel dilation and to inhibit oxidative (free radical) damage of cholesterol and the adhesion of white cells to the vascular wall (two important steps in the development of atherosclerotic plaques). A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition suggests that diets high in rice protein can help protect against atherosclerosis by increasing blood levels of nitric oxide.

In this study, when researchers gave mice bred to be apoliprotein-E deficient a purified diet containing either casein, the principal protein in dairy products, rice protein or soy protein, the mice given casein developed the largest atherosclerotic lesions. (In humans as well as animals, apolipoprotein E plays an important role in cholesterol transport, so a deficiency of this protein increases risk for the development of atherosclerosis.) Mice given rice or soy protein fared much better. In trying to understand why, the researchers evaluated blood levels of nitric oxide. Mice fed either rice or soy protein diets were found to have increased blood levels of L-arginine (the amino acid that the body uses to produce nitric oxide) and nitric oxide metabolites when compared to those given casein-based feed. However, the L-arginine content of the rice and soy diets was not high enough to explain the amount of protective benefit they conferred, so the researchers concluded that these foods must also contain other cardioprotective compounds.


A Good Source of Fiber
The health benefits of brown rice continue with its fiber, which has been shown to reduce high cholesterol levels, one more way brown rice helps prevent atherosclerosis. Fiber also helps out by keeping blood sugar levels under control, so brown rice is an excellent grain choice for people with diabetes. As we mentioned above, the fiber in brown rice can also help to protect you against colon cancer since fiber binds to cancer-causing chemicals, keeping them away from the cells lining the colon, plus it can help normalize bowel function, reducing constipation.


Fiber from Whole Grains and Fruit Protective against Breast Cancer
When researchers looked at how much fiber 35,972 participants in the UK Women's Cohort Study ate, they found a diet rich in fiber from whole grains, such as brown rice, and fruit offered significant protection against breast cancer for pre-menopausal women. (Cade JE, Burley VJ, et al., International Journal of Epidemiology).

Pre-menopausal women eating the most fiber (>30 grams daily) more than halved their risk of developing breast cancer, enjoying a 52% lower risk of breast cancer compared to women whose diets supplied the least fiber (<20 grams/day).

Fiber supplied by whole grains offered the most protection. Pre-menopausal women eating the most whole grain fiber (at least 13 g/day) had a 41% reduced risk of breast cancer, compared to those with the lowest whole grain fiber intake (4 g or less per day).

Fiber from fruit was also protective. Pre-menopausal women whose diets supplied the most fiber from fruit (at least 6 g/day) had a 29% reduced risk of breast cancer, compared to those with the lowest fruit fiber intake (2 g or less per day).

Practical Tip: As the following table shows, it's surprisingly easy to enjoy a healthy way of eating that delivers at least 13 grams of whole grain fiber and 6 grams of fiber from fruit each day.

Food

Fiber Content in Grams

Oatmeal, 1 cup

3.98

Whole wheat bread, 1 slice

2

Whole wheat spaghetti, 1 cup

6.3

Brown rice, 1 cup

3.5

Barley, 1 cup

13.6

Buckwheat, 1 cup

4.54

Rye, 1/3 cup

8.22

Corn, 1 cup

4.6

Apple, 1 medium with skin

5.0

Banana, 1 medium

4.0

Blueberries, 1 cup

3.92

Orange, 1 large

4.42

Pear, 1 large

5.02

Prunes, 1/4 cup

3.02

Strawberries, 1 cup

3.82

Raspberries, 1 cup

8.36

*Fiber content can vary between brands. Source: esha Research, Food Processor for Windows, Version 7.8

Help Prevent Gallstones
Eating foods high in insoluble fiber, such as brown rice, can help women avoid gallstones, shows a study published in theAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology.

Studying the overall fiber intake and types of fiber consumed over a 16 year period by over 69,000 women in the Nurses Health Study, researchers found that those consuming the most fiber overall (both soluble and insoluble) had a 13% lower risk of developing gallstones compared to women consuming the fewest fiber-rich foods.

Those eating the most foods rich in insoluble fiber gained even more protection against gallstones: a 17% lower risk compared to women eating the least. And the protection was dose-related; a 5-gram increase in insoluble fiber intake dropped risk dropped 10%.

How do foods rich in insoluble fiber help prevent gallstones? Researchers think insoluble fiber not only speeds intestinal transit time (how quickly food moves through the intestines), but reduces the secretion of bile acids (excessive amounts contribute to gallstone formation), increases insulin sensitivity and lowers triglycerides (blood fats). Abundant not just in brown rice but all whole grains, insoluble fiber is also found in nuts and the edible skin of fruits and vegetables including tomatoes, cucumbers, many squash, apples, berries, and pears. In addition, beans provide insoluble as well as soluble fiber.


Whole Grains and Fish Highly Protective against Childhood Asthma
According to the American Lung Association, almost 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, which is reported to be responsible for over 14 million lost school days in children, and an annual economic cost of more than $16.1 billion.

Increasing consumption of whole grains and fish could reduce the risk of childhood asthma by about 50%, suggests the International Study on Allergy and Asthma in Childhood (Tabak C, Wijga AH, Thorax).

The researchers, from the Dutch National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Utrecht University, University Medical Center Groningen, used food frequency questionnaires completed by the parents of 598 Dutch children aged 8-13 years. They assessed the children's consumption of a range of foods including fish, fruits, vegetables, dairy and whole grain products. Data on asthma and wheezing were also assessed using medical tests as well as questionnaires.

While no association between asthma and intake of fruits, vegetables, and dairy products was found (a result at odds with other studies that have supported a link between antioxidant intake, particularly vitamins C and E, and asthma), the children's intake of both whole grains and fish was significantly linked to incidence of wheezing and current asthma.

In children with a low intake of fish and whole grains, the prevalence of wheezing was almost 20%, but was only 4.2% in children with a high intake of both foods. Low intake of fish and whole grains also correlated with a much higher incidence of current asthma (16.7%). compared to only a 2.8% incidence of current asthma among children with a high intake of both foods.

After adjusting results for possible confounding factors, such as the educational level of the mother, and total energy intake, high intakes of whole grains and fish were found to be associated with a 54 and 66% reduction in the probability of being asthmatic, respectively.

The probability of having asthma with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), defined as having an increased sensitivity to factors that cause narrowing of the airways, was reduced by 72 and 88% when children had a high-intake of whole grains and fish, respectively. Lead researcher, CoraTabak commented, "The rise in the prevalence of asthma in western societies may be related to changed dietary habits." We agree. The Standard American Diet is sorely deficient in the numerous anti-inflammatory compounds found in fish and whole grains, notably, the omega-3 fats supplied by cold water fish and the magnesium and vitamin E provided by whole grains. One caution: wheat may need to be avoided as it is a common food allergen associated with asthma.


Meta-analysis Explains Whole Grains' Health Benefits
In many studies, eating whole grains, such as brown rice, has been linked to protection against atherosclerosis, ischemic stroke, diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, and premature death. A new study and accompanying editorial, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition explains the likely reasons behind these findings and recommends at least 3 servings of whole grains should be eaten daily.
Whole grains are concentrated sources of fiber. In this meta-analysis of 7 studies including more than 150,000 persons, those whose diets provided the highest dietary fiber intake had a 29% lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared to those with the lowest fiber intake.

But it's not just fiber's ability to serve as a bulking agent that is responsible for its beneficial effects as a component of whole grains. Wheat bran, for example, which constitutes 15% of most whole-grain wheat kernels but is virtually non-existent in refined wheat flour, is rich in minerals, antioxidants, lignans, and other phytonutrients—as well as in fiber.

In addition to the matrix of nutrients in their dietary fibers, the whole-grain arsenal includes a wide variety of additional nutrients and phytochemicals that reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Compounds in whole grains that have cholesterol-lowering effects include polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides, plant sterols and stanols, and saponins.

Whole grains are also important dietary sources of water-soluble, fat-soluble, and insoluble antioxidants. The long list of cereal antioxidants includes vitamin E, tocotrieonols, selenium, phenolic acids, and phytic acid. These multifunctional antioxidants come in immediate-release to slow-release forms and thus are available throughout the gastrointestinal tract over a long period after being consumed.

The high antioxidant capacity of wheat bran, for example, is 20-fold that of refined wheat flour (endosperm). Although the role of antioxidant supplements in protecting against cardiovascular disease has been questioned, prospective population studies consistently suggest that when consumed in whole foods, antioxidants are associated with significant protection against cardiovascular disease. Because free radical damage to cholesterol appears to contribute significantly to the development of atherosclerosis, the broad range of antioxidant activities from the phytonutrients abundant in whole grains is thought to play a strong role in their cardio-protective effects.

Like soybeans, whole grains are good sources of phytoestrogens, plant compounds that may affect blood cholesterol levels, blood vessel elasticity, bone metabolism, and many other cellular metabolic processes.

Whole grains are rich sources of lignans that are converted by the human gut to enterolactone and enterodiole. In studies of Finnish men, blood levels of enterolactone have been found to have an inverse relation not just to cardiovascular-related death, but to all causes of death, which suggests that the plant lignans in whole grains may play an important role in their protective effects.

Lower insulin levels may also contribute to the protective effects of whole grains. In many persons, the risks of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity are linked to insulin resistance. Higher intakes of whole grains are associated with increased sensitivity to insulin in population studies and clinical trials. Why? Because whole grains improve insulin sensitivity by lowering the glycemic index of the diet while increasing its content of fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E.

The whole kernel of truth: as part of your healthy way of eating, whole grains can significantly lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Enjoy at least 3 servings a day. No idea how to cook whole grains? Just look at the "How to Enjoy" section in our profiles of the whole grains, or for quick, easy, delicious recipes, click on this link to our Recipe Assistant and select brown rice or whichever whole grain you would like to prepare.

For all the health benefits brown rice can provide, don't forget to make this delicious, nutty-flavored grain a frequent addition to your meals.


Description
Rice is one of the most important foods in the world, supplying as much as half of the daily calories for half of the world's population. No wonder that in Asian countries, such as Thailand, rice is so highly valued that the translation of the word "to eat" literally means "to eat rice."

Asked to name the types of rice they are familiar with, people may be able to recall one or two. Yet, in actuality there is an abundance of different types of rice—over 8,000 varieties. Oftentimes, rice is categorized by its size as being either short grain, medium grain or long grain. Short grain, which has the highest starch content, makes the stickiest rice, while long grain is lighter and tends to remain separate when cooked. The qualities of medium grain fall between the other two types.

The scientific name for rice is Oryza sativa.

Another way that rice is classified is according to the degree of milling that it undergoes. This is what makes a brown rice different than white rice. Brown rice, often referred to as whole rice or cargo rice, is the whole grain with only its inedible outer hull removed. Brown rice still retains its nutrient-rich bran and germ. White rice, on the other hand, is both milled and polished, which removes the bran and germ along with all the nutrients that reside within these important layers.

Some of the most popular varieties of rice in this country include:
History
Everyone knows that rice is an ancient food, but only recently have we discovered just how ancient it is. Rice was believed to have been first cultivated in China around 6,000 years ago, but recent archaeological discoveries have found primitive rice seeds and ancient farm tools dating back about 9,000 years.

For the majority of its long history, rice was a staple only in Asia. Not until Arab travelers introduced rice into ancient Greece, and Alexander the Great brought it to India, did rice find its way to other corners of the world. Subsequently, the Moors brought rice to Spain in the 8th century during their conquests, while the Crusaders were responsible for bringing rice to France. Rice was introduced into South America in the 17th century by the Spanish during their colonization of this continent.

The majority of the world's rice is grown in Asia, where it plays an incredibly important role in their food culture. Thailand, Vietnam and China are the three largest exporters of rice.


How to Select and Store
Rice is available prepackaged as well as in bulk containers. If purchasing brown rice in a packaged container, check to see if there is a "use-by" date on the package since brown rice, owing to its natural oils, has the potential to become rancid if kept too long.

Research recently published suggests that some non-organic U.S. long grain rice may have 1.4 to 5 times more arsenic than rice from Europe, India or Bangladesh. For this reason, select organically grown rice whenever possible. (More detailed information on this study can be found below in the Individual Concerns section.)

Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the rice are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Whether purchasing rice in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture.

Since brown rice still features an oil-rich germ, it is more susceptible to becoming rancid than white rice and therefore should be stored in the refrigerator. Stored in an airtight container, brown rice will keep fresh for about six months.

While white rice varieties should also be stored in an airtight container, they can be kept in a cool, dry place rather than the refrigerator. Stored properly, they will keep fresh for about one year.

The storage of cooked rice is controversial. Most organizations recommend 4-7 days of storage in the refrigerator at most. From all of the available evidence, however, and to err on the safe side, we believe it's best to cook only the amount of rice you can consume during the day it is cooked, or at most, the following day.Several potential toxins can be produced in rice under certain conditions involving time, temperature, presence of moisture, bacterial spores, or fungi. It appears that some fungi can turn one of the amino acids (tryptophan) in rice into alpha-picolinic acid, and that this substance, when excessive, can cause hypersensitivity reactions to rice in some persons. Another mycotoxin (fungus-triggered toxin) called T-2 can also be produced in rice by the fungus Fusarium. About 300 mycotoxins are commonly found in many grains, not only rice, when these grains are allowed to become moldy. All of the research we've see on these potential toxins involves cultivation and harvesting of rice at the agricultural level rather than cooking and storage of rice at home. However, we still suggest erring on the safe side here. Be sure to keep your cooked rice in a tightly sealed container when stored in your refrigerator.


Safety
Brown rice is not a commonly allergenic food and is not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates or purines. In fact, the hypoallergenic (low-allergy) nature of whole grain, organic brown rice makes it a grain alternative commonly recommended by healthcare practitioners.


Nutritional Profile

Introduction to Food Rating System Chart
The following chart shows the nutrients for which this food is either an excellent, very good or good source. Next to the nutrient name you will find the following information: the amount of the nutrient that is included in the noted serving of this food; the %Daily Value (DV) that that amount represents (similar to other information presented in the website, this DV is calculated for 25-50 year old healthy woman); the nutrient density rating; and, the food's World's Healthiest Foods Rating. Underneath the chart is a table that summarizes how the ratings were devised.

Read detailed information on our  Food and Recipe Rating System.

Brown Rice, long grain, cooked
1.00 cup
195.00 grams

Calories: 216
GI: 
low

Nutrient

Amount

DRI/DV
(%)

Nutrient
Density

World's Healthiest
Foods Rating

manganese

1.76 mg

88.0

7.3

excellent

selenium

19.11 mcg

34.7

2.9

good

phosphorus

161.85 mg

23.1

1.9

good

copper

0.19 mg

21.1

1.8

good

magnesium

83.85 mg

21.0

1.7

good

vitamin B3

2.98 mg

18.6

1.5

good

World's Healthiest
Foods Rating

Rule

excellent

DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%

very good

DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%

good

DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%



References

CASHEWS
Nutrient DRI/DV

Copper                 97.7%

 Phosphorus       33.8%

 Manganese       33%

Magnesium        29.2%

Zinc                        21%

 


Health Benefits

Heart-Protective Monounsaturated Fats

The World’s Healthiest Foods website, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=98, shares that not only do cashews have a lower fat content than most other nuts, approximately 82% of their fat is unsaturated fatty acids, plus about 66% of this unsaturated fatty acid content are heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, similar to those found in olive oil. Studies of diabetic patients show that monounsaturated fat, when added to a low-fat diet, can help to reduce high triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are a form in which fats are carried in the blood, and high triglyceride levels are associated with an increased risk for heart disease, so ensuring you have some monounsaturated fats in your diet by enjoying cashews is a good idea, especially for persons with diabetes.


Crazy about Your Heart? Go Nuts

Research published in the British Journal of Nutrition (Blomhoff R, Carlsen MH), which identified several nuts among plant foods with the highest total antioxidant content, suggests nut's high antioxidant content may be key to their cardio-protective benefits.

Nuts' high antioxidant content helps explain results seen in the Iowa Women's Health Study in which risk of death from cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases showed strong and consistent reductions with increasing nut/peanut butter consumption. Total death rates decreased 11% and 19% for nut/peanut butter intake once per week and 1-4 times per week, respectively.

Even more impressive were the results of a review study of the evidence linking nuts and lower risk of coronary heart disease, also published in the British Journal of Nutrition. (Kelly JH, Sabate J.) In this study, researchers looked at four large prospective epidemiological studies—the Adventist Health Study, Iowa Women's Study, Nurses' Health Study and the Physician's Health Study. When evidence from all four studies was combined, subjects consuming nuts at least 4 times a week showed a 37% reduced risk of coronary heart disease compared to those who never or seldom ate nuts. Each additional serving of nuts per week was associated with an average 8.3% reduced risk of coronary heart disease.

Practical Tip: To lower your risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease, enjoy a handful of cashews or other nuts, or a tablespoon of nut butter, at least 4 times a week.


Copper for Antioxidant Defenses, Energy Production, Bones and Blood Vessels

An essential component of many enzymes, copper plays a role in a wide range of physiological processes including iron utilization, elimination of free radicals, development of bone and connective tissue, and the production of the skin and hair pigment called melanin. For example, copper is an essential component of the enzyme, superoxide dismutase, which is important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. Copper is also necessary for the activity of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking collagen and elastin, both of which provide the ground substance and flexibility in blood vessels, bones and joints. Low dietary intake of copper may also be associated with increased fecal free radical production and fecal water alkaline phosphatase activity, risk factors for colon cancer.

Numerous health problems can develop when copper intake is inadequate, including iron deficiency anemia, ruptured blood vessels, osteoporosis, joint problems such as rheumatoid arthritis, brain disturbances, elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduced HDL (good) cholesterol levels, irregular heartbeat, and increased susceptibility to infections.


Bone Up and Relax with Cashews

Everyone knows that calcium is necessary for strong bones, but magnesium is also vital for healthy bones. About two-thirds of the magnesium in the human body is found in our bones. Some helps give bones their physical structure, while the rest is found on the surface of the bone where it is stored for the body to draw upon as needed.

Magnesium, by balancing calcium, helps regulate nerve and muscle tone. In many nerve cells, magnesium serves as Nature's own calcium channel blocker, preventing calcium from rushing into the nerve cell and activating the nerve. By blocking calcium's entry, magnesium keeps our nerves (and the blood vessels and muscles they ennervate) relaxed. If our diet provides us with too little magnesium, however, calcium can gain free entry, and the nerve cell can become overactivated, sending too many messages and causing excessive contraction.

Insufficient magnesium can thus contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms (including spasms of the heart muscle or the spasms of the airways symptomatic of asthma), and migraine headaches, as well as muscle cramps, tension, soreness and fatigue. Given these effects, it is not surprising that studies have shown magnesium helps reduce the frequency of migraine attacks, lowers blood pressure, helps prevent heart attacks, promotes normal sleep patterns in women suffering from menopausal sleep disturbances, and reduces the severity of asthma.


Help Prevent Gallstones

Twenty years of dietary data collected on 80,000 women from the Nurses' Health Study shows that women who eat least 1 ounce of nuts, peanuts or peanut butter each week have a 25% lower risk of developing gallstones. Since 1 ounce is only 28.6 nuts or about 2 tablespoons of nut butter, preventing gallbladder disease may be as easy as packing one cashew butter and jelly sandwich (be sure to use whole wheat bread for its fiber, vitamins and minerals) for lunch each week, having a handful of cashews as an afternoon pick me up, or tossing some cashews on your oatmeal or salad.


Eating Nuts Lowers Risk of Weight Gain

Although nuts are known to provide a variety of cardio-protective benefits, many avoid them for fear of weight gain. A prospective study published in the journal Obesity shows such fears are groundless. In fact, people who eat nuts at least twice a week are much less likely to gain weight than those who almost never eat nuts.

The 28-month study involving 8,865 adult men and women in Spain, found that participants who ate nuts at least two times per week were 31% less likely to gain weight than were participants who never or almost never ate nuts.

And, among the study participants who gained weight, those who never or almost never ate nuts gained more (an average of 424 g more) than those who ate nuts at least twice weekly.

Study authors concluded, "Frequent nut consumption was associated with a reduced risk of weight gain (5 kg or more). These results support the recommendation of nut consumption as an important component of a cardioprotective diet and also allay fears of possible weight gain."

Practical Tip: Don't let concerns about gaining weight prevent you from enjoying the delicious taste and many health benefits of nuts!


Description

Cashew nuts are actually seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple, the fruit of the cashew tree, which is native to the coastal areas of northeastern Brazil. Cashew apples, while not known in the U.S., are regarded as delicacies in Brazil and the Carribean. The seed we know as the kidney-shaped cashew "nut" is delicate in flavor and firm, but slightly spongy, in texture.

You have probably noticed that cashews in the shell are not available in stores. This is because these nuts are always sold pre-shelled since the interior of their shells contains a caustic resin, known as cashew balm, which must be carefully removed before they are fit for consumption. This caustic resin is actually used in industry to make varnishes and insecticides.

Cashews, known scientifically as Anacardium occidentale, belong to the same family as the mango and pistachio nut.


History

The cashew tree is native to coastal areas of Brazil. In the 16th century, Portuguese explorers took cashew trees from this South American country and introduced them into other tropical regions such as India and some African countries, where they are now also cultivated. The cashew tree has always been a prized resource owing to its precious wood, cashew balm and cashew apple, but the cashew nut itself did not gain popularity until the beginning of the 20th century. Today, the leading commercial producers of cashews are India, Brazil, Mozambique, Tanzania and Nigeria.


How to Select and Store

Cashews are generally available in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the cashews are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Whether purchasing cashews in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture or insect damage and that they are not shriveled. If it is possible to smell the cashews, do so in order to ensure that they are not rancid.

Due to their high content of oleic acid, cashews are more stable than most other nuts but should still be stored in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator, where they will keep for about six months, or in the freezer, where they will keep for about one year. Cashew butter should always be refrigerated once it is opened.


Individual Concerns

Cashews and Oxalates
Cashews are among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health problems. For this reason, individuals with already existing and untreated kidney or gallbladder problems may want to avoid eating cashews. Laboratory studies have shown that oxalates may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body. Yet, in every peer-reviewed research study we've seen, the ability of oxalates to lower calcium absorption is relatively small and definitely does not outweigh the ability of oxalate-containing foods to contribute calcium to the meal plan. If your digestive tract is healthy, and you do a good job of chewing and relaxing while you enjoy your meals, you will get significant benefits—including absorption of calcium—from calcium-rich foods plant foods that also contain oxalic acid. Ordinarily, a healthcare practitioner would not discourage a person focused on ensuring that they are meeting their calcium requirements from eating these nutrient-rich foods because of their oxalate content. For more on this subject, please see "Can you tell me what oxalates are and in which foods they can be found?"


Allergic Reactions to Tree Nuts (Such as Cashews)

Although allergic reactions can occur to virtually any food, research studies on food allergy consistently report more problems with some foods than with others. It's important to realize that the frequency of problems varies from country to country and can change significantly along with changes in the food supply or with other manufacturing practices. For example, in several part of the world, including Canada, Japan, and Israel, sesame seed allergy has risen to a level of major concern over the past 10 years.

In the United States, beginning in 2004 with the passage of the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), food labels have been required to identify the presence of any major food allergens. Since 90% of food allergies in the U.S. have been associated with 8 food types as reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, it is these 8 food types that are considered to be major food allergens in the U.S. and require identification on food labels. The 8 food types classified as major allergens are as follows: (1) wheat, (2) cow's milk, (3) hen's eggs, (4) fish, (5) crustacean shellfish (including shrimp, prawns, lobster and crab); (6) tree nuts (including cashews, almonds, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts and chestnuts); (7) peanuts; and (8) soy foods. In the case of cashews, there is also some evidence showing cross-reactivity with peanuts, walnuts, and sesame seeds, such that persons suspecting food allergy to cashews may also want to determine the dietary safety and appropriateness of these other foods.

These foods do not need to be eaten in their pure, isolated form in order to trigger an adverse reaction. For example, yogurt made from cow's milk is also a common allergenic food, even though the cow's milk has been processed and fermented in order to make the yogurt. Ice cream made from cow's milk would be an equally good example.

Food allergy symptoms may sometimes be immediate and specific, and can include skin rash, hives, itching, and eczema; swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat; tingling in the mouth; wheezing or nasal congestion; trouble breathing; and dizziness or lightheadedness. But food allergy symptoms may also be much more general and delayed, and can include fatigue, depression, chronic headache, chronic bowel problems (such as diarrhea or constipation), and insomnia. Because most food allergy symptoms can be caused by a variety of other health problems, it is good practice to seek the help of a healthcare provider when evaluating the role of food allergies in your health.


Nutritional Profile

Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, and zinc.

For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: Cashews.


In-Depth Nutritional Profile

In addition to the nutrients highlighted in our ratings chart, an in-depth nutritional profile forCashews is also available. This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and more.


Introduction to Food Rating System Chart
In order to better help you identify foods that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Food Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the foods that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which this food is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the food doesn't contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this food's in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients - not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good - please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you'll need to glance up in the top left corner where you will find the name of the food and the serving size we used to calculate the food's nutrient composition. This serving size will tell you how much of the food you need to eat to obtain the amount of nutrients found in the chart. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this food and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling." 

Read more background information and details of our rating system
.

Cashews, raw
0.25 cup
40.00 grams

Calories: 221
GI: 
low

Nutrient

Amount

DRI/DV
(%)

Nutrient
Density

World's Healthiest
Foods Rating

copper

0.88 mg

97.8

8.0

excellent

phosphorus

237.20 mg

33.9

2.8

good

manganese

0.66 mg

33.0

2.7

good

magnesium

116.80 mg

29.2

2.4

good

zinc

2.31 mg

21.0

1.7

good

World's Healthiest
Foods Rating

Rule

excellent

DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%

very good

DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%

good

DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%


In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Cashews

References
AVOCADOS
HEART HEALTHY BENEFITS:
The California Avocado Commission, http://www.avocado.org/avocado-nutrients/, shares the benefits of eating nutrient dense foods as being one of the healthiest ways to eat. Nutrient density is a measure of the amount of nutrients a food contains in comparison to the number of calories. Avocados are naturally nutrient dense and contain the following key nutrients:



There are 13 vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate). Avocados naturally contain many of these vitamins.
• MONOUNSATURATED FATS (3g per serving) – Helps to lower blood cholesterol if used in place of saturated fats.
• VITAMIN K (6.3 mcg/8% DV per serving) – Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays an important role in blood clotting. It is known as the clotting vitamin, because without it blood would not clot. Some studies indicate that it helps in maintaining strong bones in the elderly.
• FOLATE (27 mcg/6% DV per serving) – Promotes healthy cell and tissue development. This is especially important during periods of rapid cell division and growth such as infancy and pregnancy. Folate is also essential for metabolism of homocysteine and helps maintain normal levels of this amino acid.
• POTASSIUM (152 mg/4% DV per serving) – In the body, potassium is classified is an electrolyte. Potassium is a very important mineral to the human body. It has various roles in metabolism and body functions and is essential for the proper function of all cells, tissues, and organs: It assists in the regulation of the acid-base balance; assists in protein synthesis from amino acids and in carbohydrate metabolism; and, it is necessary for the building of muscle and for normal body growth.
• VITAMIN E (.590 mg/4% DV per serving) – A fat-soluble vitamin that acts as an antioxidant that protects the body tissue from damage caused by unstable substances called free radicals. Free radicals can harm cells, tissues, and organs. They are believed to play a role in certain conditions associated with aging. Vitamin E is important in the formation of red blood cells and helps the body use vitamin K. At lower levels, vitamin E may help protect the heart. Vitamin E also plays a role in healthy skin and hair.
• LUTEIN (81 mcg) – A carotenoid (a natural pigment) that may be associated with a lower risk of eye diseases. Lutein is an important antioxidant that may help your eyes stay healthy while maintaining the health of your skin. It provides nutritional support to your eyes and skin and has been linked to promoting healthy eyes through reducing the risk of macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in adults 65 years of age and older.
• MAGNESIUM (9.0 mg/2% DV per serving) –An essential mineral for human nutrition. Magnesium in the body serves several important functions: Contraction and relaxation of muscles; Function of certain enzymes in the body; Production and transport of energy; and Production of Protein.
• VITAMIN C (2.6 mg/4% DV per serving) –A water-soluble vitamin that is necessary for normal growth and development. Vitamin C is one of many antioxidants. Antioxidants are nutrients that block some of the damage caused by free radicals, which are by-products that result when our bodies transform food into energy. Vitamin C is required for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body. It is necessary to form collagen, an important protein used to make skin, scar tissue, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels.
• VITAMIN B6 (0.086 mg/4% DV per serving) –A water-soluble vitamin. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water. The body cannot store them. That means you need a continuous supply of such vitamins in your diet. Vitamin B6 helps the immune system produce antibodies. Antibodies are needed to fight many diseases. Vitamin B6 helps maintain normal nerve function and form red blood cells. The body uses it to help break down proteins. The more protein you eat, the more vitamin B6 you need.
A new study from researchers and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston found that diets high in monosaturated and polysaturated fats – the good fats found in foods like nuts, olive oil and avocados – is a strong indicated of overall brain health and verbal memory health as you age.
POLYFATS – OMEGA 3/OMEGA 6
HEALTH BENEFITS:
Omega-3
Omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make.
Humans must eat them through food, which means getting EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) from seafood, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackere or shellfish, and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) from sources such as walnuts, flaxseed, and canola and soybean oils. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly EPA and DHA, have been shown to benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk for — or who already have — cardiovascular disease.

Omega-6
Omega-6 (n-6 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are the other group of essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Hence, they need to be consumed in the diet.
Food sources of omega-6 fatty acids include some vegetable oils (soybean, safflower, sunflower or corn oils), nuts and seeds. Increased consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in place of saturated fats and trans fats is associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease.
Source: Source: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/
Note: See our section on Macronutrients – Fats, A Misunderstood Nutrient
WATER
HEALTH BENEFITS:
"Water is the life blood of the earth. When water is healthy it has a complex structure that enables it to communicate information, carry energy, nutrients and healing, to self-cleanse and discharge wastes."
    ~Viktor Schauberger, Forester, Naturalist and Water Visionary


Be intentional about your health as if your life depends on it… Water, the natural missing element that prevents —even cures —the body’s painful degenerative diseases (a symptom of unease in our bodies talking to us), naturally, at no cost.

Our water supply is contaminated with poisonous toxins like sodium Fluoride, just to name one.  Did you know that Flouride is also one of the basic ingredients of PROZAC?  Did you know that in addition to being one of the primary ingredients in cockroach and rat poisons, it is also a main ingredient in anesthetic, hypnotic and psychiatric drugs as well as military NERVE GAS?  The labels on the back of our fluorinated toothpastes say that if more than a pea size if swallowed to call a poison control center. 

Water is our most critical element to sustaining life as well as our mental, emotional and physical well-being….

Is knowing what we’re putting in our bodies critical to our overall well-being and worth the time to investigate?

Knowledge is power…. While ignorance is bliss, the cost of our malignant ignorance (lack of knowledge) is curable and the preponderance of evidence is too readily available to ignore.  There’s a lot more at stake than just our health!

In an article from OTT called: “The Truth About Flouride” which you can read in its entirety at: http://www.greaterthings.com/Lexicon/F/Flouride.htm  it states, “Repeated doses of infinitesimal amounts of fluoride will in time reduce an individuals power to resist domination, by slowly poisoning and narcotizing a certain area of the brain, thus making him submissibe to the will of those who wish to govern him. (A convenient and cost-effective light lobotomy?---Ott).

Think about it, depending on age, our chemical composition is mostly water. Dr. F. Batmanghelid, MD (known as Dr. B), dedicated his medical practice, and life, to educating us on our Bodies Many Cries for water. You can read his work and decide for yourself how to empower this healing elixir into your health and life: http://www.watercure.com/index.php

The European, London, UK shares, “The water principle has convincing logic but turns much of the current medical practice on its head."

-The Washington Times shares, "When Dr. Batmanghelidj thinks of a glass of water, he doesn't think of it as half full or half empty. He thinks of it as brimming over with the essential fluid of life. He thinks of it as the solvent of our ills and deliverer of ripe old age. He thinks of it as the wave of the future."

The time has come to empower our own lives, by taking control of our body, our mind, and our hearts, by learning to listen to our body’s symptoms of truth as a road map to our own freedom and sovereignty, our health, and our happiness.

Dr. B's pioneering work shows that Unintentional Chronic Dehydration (UCD) contributes to and even produces pain and many degenerative diseases that can be prevented and treated by increasing water intake on a regular basis.

The source of our essential fluid of all life is water. Your muscles that move your body are 75% water; your blood that transports nutrients is 82% water; your lungs that provide oxygen are 90% water; your brain that is the control center of your body is 76% water; even your bones are 25% water. Your health, and life, is truly dependent on the quality and quantity of the water you drink.

If you are committed to a healthy lifestyle for yourself and your loved ones, make drinking enough ionized water (half of your body weight/per day, in ounces) a habit in your life won't take long for you to feel the benefits.

It is one of the most important investments you can make for your long-term health.

For over 20 years, I’ve been investigating water.  There’s a maze of information and drinking purified water, water from water softeners and reverse osmosis strip water of calcium and magnesium.  Calcium and magnesium contribute to the yin and yang of our life processes.   Calcium constricts our muscles and magnesium relaxes our muscles.  These are the two primary minerals dissolved by water as it seeps down into the earth.  Water has been a primary source of these minerals for our bodies and for all life forms on the planet for eons and now we are removing them from the water. This doesn’t sound like a good idea, does it?  

Did you know that muscle is 1% protein molecules and 99% water molecules. Why does mainstream science study only protein molecules while neglecting  99% of what constitutes muscle structure? A muscle builder can create a magnificent physique utilizing motion and energy. What is creating  his perfect human structure? Mostly water molecules!

Did you know that disease cannot exist in a structured water environment?

Modern science and the resulting water systems now available destructures and de-energizes water, using electricity, unnatural motions and unnatural energies resulting in toxic water.  In my relentless pursuit to find water that supported life, after buying into the big “alkaline” water system craze, I have found only one unit that reverses the toxic effects of modern technologies, creating water that feeds, cleanses and protects all life forms.  Here’s the link to the awesome Creators: http://www.greenfieldnaturals.com/domestic/ 

Note:  If you tell them that NutBurgers or OneTeam Humanity Foods referred you, you’ll receive a 20% discount on your purchase.

While I am an advocate for sharing forward information that matters, I don’t generally recommend any products on our website.  However, because I have dedicated my life and am passionate about empowering humanity with truth and feeding us nutrient-dense food, and knowledge, that our bodies crave, need and love, I can wholeheartedly recommend this system, without profit or motive.  It is certainly less expensive than buying water and what I love is that whether you’re in an apartment or a home, it is a simple plumbing installation, can be removed when you leave, and makes even your shower water, the laundry water, and any water than touches you or your family’s precious hearts, healing and healthy.  My desire is that you and everyone you know empower yourself, your families, your friends, and co-workers and, ultimately, our world.  To build a future worth choosing, I believe it is critical that we take the time to understand and share forward things that matter to us.  Water and our food is the lifeforce energy that sustains our very life, and any toxins being added that seek to anesthetize or harm our humanity is immoral, unethical and criminal.

WE, The People, in our collective voice, do matter and do hold the power!  We vote soul into our money (and power) by the choices we make. 

Infinite Gratitude and Love for YOU!  Being YOU!

TURMERIC
HEALTH BENEFITS:
The bright yellow color in Indian curries come from TURMERIC: a ginger-related shrub. But the spice contains more than just golden pigment – as a study published in the British Journal of Cancer shows, TURMERIC’s curcumin killed cells in cancer of the esophagus.
SAGE
HEALTH BENEFITS:
The health benefits of cumin include its ability to aid in digestion, improving immunity and treating piles, insomnia, respiratory disorders, asthma, bronchitis, common cold, lactation, anemia, skin disorders, boils and cancer.

Cumin, scientifically known as Cuminum Cyminum, belongs to family Apiaceae and is extensively used in culinary in Indian Subcontinent and some other Asian, African and Latin American countries, as a condiment or spice. Those who are of the opinion that spices are bad for health should note that cumin can be beneficial for some of their most dreaded diseases, beyond their expectations. Let’s see how.

The health benefits of cumin include the following:

Digestion: Cumin is extremely good for digestion and related problems. The very smell (aroma) of it, which comes from an aromatic organic compound called Cuminaldehyde, the main component of its essential oil, activates our salivary glands in our mouth (the mouth watering flavor), facilitating the primary digestion of the food. Next is Thymol, a compound present in cumin, which does same to the glands which secrete acids, bile and enzymes responsible for complete digestion of the food in the stomach and the intestines, due to its Stimulating properties. Cumin is also Carminative i.e. relieves from you from gas troubles and thereby improves digestion and appetite. Due to its essential oils, magnesium and sodium content, it promotes digestion and also gives relief in stomach-ache when taken with hot water (like aqua ptycotis and mint).

Piles: The main reason behind piles is constipation added with infections in the wound in the anal tract, which again is caused by constipation. Cumin, because of its dietary fiber content and carminative, stimulating, anti fungal and anti microbial properties due to the presence of essential oils comprising mainly of Cuminaldehyde and certain pyrazines, acts as a natural laxative in powdered form, helps healing up of infections or wounds in the digestive & excretory system and speeds up digestion too. What else a patient of piles would want?

Insomnia: This is a very peculiar property of cumin. It is a stimulant as well as a relaxant at the same time. This property cannot be attributed to a single component alone, just as causes of insomnia cannot be attributed to a single cause. But studies show that a proper intake of vitamins (particularly B-complex) and a good digestion help induce a sound sleep. Cumin helps both of these. Some of the components of the essential oil are hypnotic in nature and have tranquilizing effects.
Respiratory Disorders, Asthma, Bronchitis etc. Presence of caffeine (the stimulating agent), the richly aromatic essential oils (the disinfectants) make cumin an ideal anti congestive combination for those suffering from respiratory disorders such as Asthma, Bronchitis etc.

Common Cold: Common Cold is a viral infection which affects our body frequently when our immune system goes weak. Again, the essential oils present in cumin act as disinfectants and help fight viral infections which cause common cold. Cumin also does not let cough formation in the respiratory system as it is supposed to be hot and dries up the excess mucus. Cumin is rich in iron and has considerable amount of vitamin-C, which are essential for a good immunity and keeps infections away.

Lactation: It is rich in iron and thus very good for lactating mothers as well as women who are undergoing menses or who are pregnant, since they are more in need of iron than others. Moreover, cumin is said to help ease and increase secretion of milk in lactating women due to presence of Thymol, which tends to increase secretions from glands, including milk which is a secretion from mammary glands. It is more beneficial if taken with honey. Cumin has remarkable amount of calcium (above 900 mg per 100 grams) which accounts to over 90% of our daily requirement of calcium. This calcium is an important constituent of milk and hence cumin is very good for lactating mothers.

Anemia: As stated above, cumin is very rich in iron (above 66 mg. in each 100 grams) which is more than 5 times the daily requirement of iron for an adult. This iron is the main constituent of haemoglobin in the red blood corpuscles of blood. It is haemoglobin which transfers oxygen (as oxide of iron) to the body-cells and whose deficiency causes anemia. So, cumin can be a nutritious additive to daily diet for anemic people.

Skin Disorders: Almost all of us know that vitamin-E is good for skin. It keeps the skin young and glowing. This vitamin is also present in abundance in cumin. The essential oils present in this have disinfectant and anti fungal properties. This prevents any microbial and fungal infection from affecting the skin.

Boils: Boils are just outlets for removal of toxic substances and foreign matters such as microbes etc. from the body. So, they are rather symptoms which show that a lot of toxic substances have accumulated in the body. Here cumin can help you a great deal. Those who regularly use cumin in food have been seen keeping free from boils, rashes, pimples etc. Components such as Cuminaldehyde, Thymol, phosphorus etc. are good de-toxicants which help in the regular removal of toxins from body, through excretory system of course, and not through boils.

Immunity: As discussed above, abundance of iron, presence of essential oils and vitamin-C & vitamin-A in cumin boosts up our immune system.

Cancer: Cumin itself has detoxifying and chemo-preventive properties and accelerates secretion of detoxifying and anti-carcinogenic enzymes from the glands, as it does to other secretions. As well as, it has nice anti oxidants like vitamin-C and vitamin-A in it, in addition to those essential oils, which, besides having countless other benefits, have anti carcinogenic properties too. It is particularly good for cancer of colon.

Other benefits: Cumin is also beneficial in treating renal coli, weak memory or lack of concentration, insect bites and sting etc.
This article was contributed from: http://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/seed-and-nut/health-benefits-of-cumin.html
MACRONUTRIENTS
MACRONUTRIENTS ARE YOUR BEST FRIENDS: FATS, PROTEINS & CARBS
Fats, proteins and carbohydrates are “macronutrients” – nutritional components of the human diet that the body requires large quantities of in order for the body to carry out essential functions. The pie graph below shows a 30/30/40 ratio, which is a healthy place to start when feeding our body. The carbohydrates should come from one-half whole soaked grains, and the other half from fruits and vegetables. Remember though, our bodies are different and learning to listen to your own body’s needs is the first, most important step, to empowering your life and health.

Did you know you must consume fat to burn fat? This misunderstood essential macronutrient is highly valued and is so important in our diets. Healthy fats sourced from fatty fish, coconut oil and butters, nuts, seeds, and nuts and seed oils, in some cultures prize it above all else. Despite all the negative press attached to fats, with fat-free being the marketing rage, not all fats are bad. In fact, our body needs fats to carry out some of the body’s essential crucial functions. Both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats can also lower the risk for several serious health conditions like, heart and cardiovascular diseases.

The fats that are considered harmful for your health are saturated and trans fats (partially hydrogenated). They are known to raise the risk for heart and cardiovascular diseases by increasing the level of LDL cholesterol in the body.

There is one exception to the saturated fats rule: coconut oil. There is a widespread misconception that coconut oil is bad for you because it is said to raise blood cholesterol and cause heart disease. That misconception was from a four decade old study using hydrogenated coconut oil. It is important to know that the process of hydrogenation creates "trans fatty acids" (TFAs), which are toxic entities that enter cell membranes, block utilization of essential fatty acids (EFAs) and impede cell functionality. TFAs also cause a rise in blood cholesterol. These substances are not present in natural coconut oil.

Widespread studies of coconut-consuming populations such as those found in Polynesia and Sri Lanka, show that "dietary coconut oil does not lead to high serum cholesterol nor to high coronary heart disease mortality or morbidity. Other studies show no change in serum cholesterol level from coconut oil. And if it is true that the herpes virus and cytomegalovirus have a causative role in the initial formation of atherosclerotic plaques, coconut oil may be beneficial in preventing heart disease.

Again, another reason to be proactive in your health.

  FATS   PROTEINS   CARBS  
  Energy source                                  Supports body’s immune system            Energy source  
  Necessary for liver function healthy   Produces hormones  

Promotes a healthy gastrointestinal tract

 
  Enhances flavor of food   Produces enzymes that help catalyze chemical reactions in the body   Promotes overall bodily function  
 

Required for the
absorption of vitamins A, D, Eand K

  Aids muscle components to contract and move      
  Important in the construction of cell membranes   Supports structural components : cartilage, keratin, collagen and elastin      
 

Plays a role in slowing absorption of food for energy
production

         
 

Maintain skin elasticity and eye functions

         
 

Maintains heart rhythm

         
 

Lowers LDL cholesterol

         
 

Prevents inflammation

         
 

Maintains healthy nervous system

         

Sources:
Kaunitz H, Dayrit CS. Coconut oil consumption and coronary heart disease. Philippine Journal of Internal Medicine 1992;30:165-171. Prior IA, Davidson F, Salmond CE, Czochanska Z. Cholesterol, coconuts, and diet on Polynesian atolls: a natural experiment: the Pukapuka and Tokelau Island studies. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1981;34:1552-1561. Kurup PA, Rajmohan T. II. Consumption of coconut oil and coconut kernel and the incidence of atherosclerosis. Coconut and Coconut Oil in Human Nutrition, Proceedings. Symposium on Coconut and Coconut Oil in Human Nutrition. 27 March 1994. Coconut Development Board, Kochi, India, 1995, pp 35-59 New York Times, Medical Science, Tuesday, January 29, 1991. Common virus seen as having early role in arteries' clogging (byline Sandra Blakeslee). Coconut: In Support of good Health in the 21st Century, by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D., F.A.C.N. http://www.lauric.org/functional.html
SAGE
HEALTH BENEFITS:
Two studies at The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NC-CAM) report two studies that reveal that consuming sage may improve mental performances and memory. Another study snows sage extract to improve brain performance in those with Alzheimer’s disease, add one gram of sage per day.
CAYENNE
HEALTH BENEFITS:
A most wonderful resource: http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/benefits-of-cayenne-pepper/ lists the following 17 health benefits to cayenne.  That’s one hot list of health benefits!

Many societies, especially those of the Americas and China, have consistently used cayenne pepper therapeutically. A powerful anti-inflammatory, cayenne pepper is currently gaining buzz for cleansing and detoxifying regimes such as the Master Cleanse,  which uses the spice to stimulate circulation and neutralize acidity.

Cayenne pepper has been used for a variety of ailments including heartburn, delirium, tremors, gout, paralysis, fever, dyspepsia, flatulence, sore throat, atonic dyspepsia, hemorrhoids, menorrhagia in women, nausea, tonsillitis, scarlet fever and diphtheria

1. Anti-Irritant Properties : Cayenne has the ability to ease stomach upset, ulcers, sore throats, spasmodic and irritating coughs, and diarrhea.

2. Anti-Cold and Flu Agent : Cayenne pepper aids in breaking up and moving congested mucus. Once mucus begins to leave the body, generally relief from flu symptoms follows.

3. Anti-Fungal Properties
: The results of one study indicated that cayenne pepper could effectively prevent the formation of the fungal pathogens phomopsis and collectotrichum.

4. Migraine Headache Prevention
: This may be related to the pepper’s ability to stimulate a pain response in a different area of the body, thus reverting the brain’s attention to the new site. Following this initial pain reaction, the nerve fibers have a depleted substance P (the nerve’s pain chemical), and the perception of pain is lessened.

5. Anti-Alergen
: Cayenne is an anti-inflammatory agent and may even help to relieve allergies.

6. Digestive Aid
: Cayenne is well known digestive aid. It stimulates the digestive tract, increasing the flow of enzyme production and gastric juices. This aids the body’s ability to be able to metabolize food (and toxins). Cayenne is also helpful for relieving intestinal gas. It stimulates intestinal peristaltic motion, aiding in both assimilation and elimination.

7. Anti-Inflammatory Properties
: Cayenne’s anti-inflammatory properties make it a great herb for arthritis, diabetes, psoriasis, and herpes-related nerve damage.

8. Helps Produce Saliva
: Cayenne stimulates the production of saliva, an important key to excellent digestion and maintaining optimal oral health.

9. Prevents and Treats Blood Clots
: Cayenne pepper also helps reduce arteriolosclerosis, encourages fibrinolytic activity and prevents the formation of blood clots, all of which can help reduce the chances of heart attack or stroke.

10. Detox Support
: Cayenne is a known circulatory stimulate. It also increase the pulse of our lymphatic and digestive rhythms. By heating the body, the natural process of detoxification is streamlined. Cayenne also causes us the sweat, another important process of detoxification. Combined with lemon juice, and honey, is an excellent morning beverage for total body detox.

11. Joint-Pain Reliever
: Extremely high in a substance called capsaicin, cayenne pepper acts to cause temporary pain on the skin, which sends chemical messengers from the skin into the joint, offering contamination from bacteria.

12. Anti-Bacterial Properties
: Cayenne is an excellent preservative and has been used traditionally to prevent food contamination from bacteria.

13. Possible Anti-Cancer Agent
: Studies done at the Loma Linda University in California found that cayenne pepper can prevent lung cancer in smokers. This again may be related to cayenne’s high quantity of capsaicin, a substance that can stop the formation of tobacco-induced lung tumors. Other studies have also shown a similar reaction in cayenne’s ability to inhibit liver tumors.

14. Supports Weight Loss
: Scientists at the Laval University in Quebec found that participants who took cayenne pepper for breakfast found to have less appetite, leading to less caloric intake throughout the day. Cayenne is also a great metabolic booster, aiding the body in burning excess amounts of fats.

15. Improves Heart Health
: Cayenne helps to keep blood pressure levels normalized. It also rids the body of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

16. Remedy for Toothaches
: Cayenne is an excellent agent against tooth and gum diseases.

17. Topical Remedy
: As a poultice, cayenne has been used to treat snakebites, rheumatism, inflammation, sores, wounds and lumbago.
CHILI POWDER
HEALTH BENEFITS:
Chili powder is actually a fairly healthy seasoning, with significant amounts of several beneficial nutrients: Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and minerals.

Vitamin A : There are about 2,224 IU of vitamin A in a tablespoon of chili powder. That is 44.5 percent of your recommended daily vitamin A intake. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, your body needs vitamin A for the maintenance of your eyesight as you age as well as to contribute to maintaining the health of your bones, teeth, skin, internal membranes and reproductive systems.

Vitamin C : One tablespoon of chili powder contains 4.8 mg of vitamin C, which is about 8 percent of your daily recommended vitamin C intake. According to the Office of Dietary Supplements by the National Institutes of Health, vitamin C is an antioxidant. Your body uses antioxidants to fight damage from free radicals, which are unstable molecules created during the energy creation process that can increase your risk of developing harmful health conditions like cancer and heart disease. Vitamin C also helps strengthen your immune system and heal injuries.

Minerals : Chili powder is also rich in several important minerals. One tablespoon contains 143.7 mg of potassium, or 4.1 percent of your daily recommendation; 22.7 mg of phosphorus, or 2.3 percent of your daily recommendation; 20.9 mg of calcium, or 2.1 percent of your daily recommendation; and 1.1 mg of iron, or 5.9 percent of your daily recommendation. It also contains 0.2 mg each of zinc and manganese and 0.5 mcg of selenium.

Other Nutritional Information : Each 1-tablespoon serving of chili powder contains 23.6 calories, with 1.3 g of total fat, or about 2 percent of your daily recommendation, and 0.2 g of saturated fat, or about 1 percent of your daily recommendation. It contains no cholesterol, as well as 4.1 g of total carbohydrates, 2.6 g of dietary fiber, 0.5 g of total sugars and 0.9 g of protein.

References :
CalorieLab: Spices, Chili Powder
Office of Dietary Supplements: Vitamin C
University of Maryland Medical Center; Vitamin A; Linda Vorvick, MD; March 2009
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/434794-chili-powder-health-benefits/#ixzz297iBo7YX
OMEGA 3/OMEGA 6
HEALTH BENEFITS:
Omega-3
Omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make.
Humans must eat them through food, which means getting EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) from seafood, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackere or shellfish, and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) from sources such as walnuts, flaxseed, and canola and soybean oils. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly EPA and DHA, have been shown to benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk for — or who already have — cardiovascular disease.

Omega-6
Omega-6 (n-6 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are the other group of essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Hence, they need to be consumed in the diet.
Food sources of omega-6 fatty acids include some vegetable oils (soybean, safflower, sunflower or corn oils), nuts and seeds. Increased consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in place of saturated fats and trans fats is associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease.
Source: Source: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/
Note: See our section on Macronutrients – Fats, A Misunderstood Nutrient
OLEIC ACID
HEALTH BENEFITS:
Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid found naturally in many plant sources and in animal products. It is an omega-nine fatty acid, and considered one of the healthier sources of fat in the diet. It’s commonly used as a replacement for animal fat sources that are high in saturated fat. You may find various butter and egg substitutes made with high levels of oleic acid.

As a fat, oleic acid is one of the better ones to consume. As a replacement for other saturated fats, it can lower total cholesterol level and raise levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) while lowering low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), also known as the “bad” cholesterol. Usually switching to oil high in oleic acid is not difficult since there are numerous sources available.

From a health standpoint, oleic acid exhibits further benefits. It has been shown to slow the development of heart disease, and promotes the production of antioxidants. One very interesting use of oleic acid is its use as an ingredient in Lorenzo’s oil, a medication developed to prevent onset of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a condition affecting only young boys that attacks the myelin sheaths of the body, causing symptoms similar to those in multiple sclerosis. Though Lorenzo’s oil does not cure the condition, it can delay onset or progression of the disease in those who are not yet symptomatic.
MACRONUTRIENTS
MACRONUTRIENTS ARE YOUR BEST FRIENDS: FATS, PROTEINS & CARBS
Fats, proteins and carbohydrates are “macronutrients” – nutritional components of the human diet that the body requires large quantities of in order for the body to carry out essential functions. The pie graph below shows a 30/30/40 ratio, which is a healthy place to start when feeding our body. The carbohydrates should come from one-half whole soaked grains, and the other half from fruits and vegetables. Remember though, our bodies are different and learning to listen to your own body’s needs is the first, most important step, to empowering your life and health.

Did you know you must consume fat to burn fat? This misunderstood essential macronutrient is highly valued and is so important in our diets. Healthy fats sourced from fatty fish, coconut oil and butters, nuts, seeds, and nuts and seed oils, in some cultures prize it above all else. Despite all the negative press attached to fats, with fat-free being the marketing rage, not all fats are bad. In fact, our body needs fats to carry out some of the body’s essential crucial functions. Both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats can also lower the risk for several serious health conditions like, heart and cardiovascular diseases.

The fats that are considered harmful for your health are saturated and trans fats (partially hydrogenated). They are known to raise the risk for heart and cardiovascular diseases by increasing the level of LDL cholesterol in the body.

There is one exception to the saturated fats rule: coconut oil. There is a widespread misconception that coconut oil is bad for you because it is said to raise blood cholesterol and cause heart disease. That misconception was from a four decade old study using hydrogenated coconut oil. It is important to know that the process of hydrogenation creates "trans fatty acids" (TFAs), which are toxic entities that enter cell membranes, block utilization of essential fatty acids (EFAs) and impede cell functionality. TFAs also cause a rise in blood cholesterol. These substances are not present in natural coconut oil.

Widespread studies of coconut-consuming populations such as those found in Polynesia and Sri Lanka, show that "dietary coconut oil does not lead to high serum cholesterol nor to high coronary heart disease mortality or morbidity. Other studies show no change in serum cholesterol level from coconut oil. And if it is true that the herpes virus and cytomegalovirus have a causative role in the initial formation of atherosclerotic plaques, coconut oil may be beneficial in preventing heart disease.

Again, another reason to be proactive in your health.

  FATS   PROTEINS   CARBS  
  Energy source                                  Supports body’s immune system            Energy source  
  Necessary for liver function healthy   Produces hormones  

Promotes a healthy gastrointestinal tract

 
  Enhances flavor of food   Produces enzymes that help catalyze chemical reactions in the body   Promotes overall bodily function  
 

Required for the
absorption of vitamins A, D, Eand K

  Aids muscle components to contract and move      
  Important in the construction of cell membranes   Supports structural components : cartilage, keratin, collagen and elastin      
 

Plays a role in slowing absorption of food for energy
production

         
 

Maintain skin elasticity and eye functions

         
 

Maintains heart rhythm

         
 

Lowers LDL cholesterol

         
 

Prevents inflammation

         
 

Maintains healthy nervous system

         

Sources:
Kaunitz H, Dayrit CS. Coconut oil consumption and coronary heart disease. Philippine Journal of Internal Medicine 1992;30:165-171. Prior IA, Davidson F, Salmond CE, Czochanska Z. Cholesterol, coconuts, and diet on Polynesian atolls: a natural experiment: the Pukapuka and Tokelau Island studies. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1981;34:1552-1561. Kurup PA, Rajmohan T. II. Consumption of coconut oil and coconut kernel and the incidence of atherosclerosis. Coconut and Coconut Oil in Human Nutrition, Proceedings. Symposium on Coconut and Coconut Oil in Human Nutrition. 27 March 1994. Coconut Development Board, Kochi, India, 1995, pp 35-59 New York Times, Medical Science, Tuesday, January 29, 1991. Common virus seen as having early role in arteries' clogging (byline Sandra Blakeslee). Coconut: In Support of good Health in the 21st Century, by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D., F.A.C.N. http://www.lauric.org/functional.html
Dear Grocer:

There is a new amazingly yummy product available that is a 100% Vegan, Gluten-Free, and NON-GMO choice in the marketplace called Nutburgers.  This is not just another vegetarian burger, it is not only “craveable” and so amazing that even the hard core carnivore would want to make it a main staple in their diet, as a healthier food choice, but the founding company is committed to donating the proceeds to helping feed hungry tummies all over the world!

I’d like to request that you contact the supplier, OneTeam Humanity Foods at: purchase@nutburgers.com, or (888) 989-(NUTZ) 6889, to discuss the possibilities of stocking this item in your frozen food section, right where your current meat and meat alternative burger products are available.

One bite of a Nutburger and I know you’ll understand why I’ve gone out my way and made a special and specific request from my favorite grocer.

I’d love for you to let me know when I might, hopefully, anticipate this amazing new product line-up in your freezer section, so I can tell all of my friends about NutBurgers, NutBalls and NutTacos… I promise that even you will go NUTZZZ ~they’re “craveable!”

Infinite Gratitude for YOU!

Your Neighbor and Customer
50% OF PROCEEDS FEED HUMANITY

OneTeam Humanity is our non-profit which is committed to feeding humanity wherever there is a need. Whether that need is fed from a desire to make healthy eating choices, or feed a hungry belly, or feed a heart in need of emotional support, all of these needs are key ingredients in creating a healthy sense of overall happiness and well-being in the micro, our immediate families, and in the macrocosm of ourwell-being for our global family. We believe at OneTeam Humanity in supporting a new model for sharing,for health, and for enterprise(inner-prize) that exemplifies a new model paradigm which believes, and supports, that we live in awholisticorganic system of nature that is irreducibly interconnected and when one part of our system is out of balance, the whole of that system is imbalanced, whether experienced in the micro or the macro, the internal or the external, we were designed to operate as a fully interconnected healingorganism and system.

Nutburgers model for enterprise, and contributing, came about when the Founder, Carla Lee Johnston, realized that the monetary systems at play in commerce today are imbalanced and do not support a morewholistic win-win model for enterprise (inner-prize), and exchange for value, that is more intrinsic to our true nature to contribute to one another in a way that makes life more wonderful. Today’s current paradigms do not look to serve what is of the highest contribution to our families, and world, when making decisions that affect our overall health, whether that is in our personal health, or whether that is our long-term economic health. We believe that this modeling will represent a solid new model for co-creating win-win exchangesfor contributing goods and services to humanity in a way that helps us celebrate, supportand contribute to a future worth choosing.

In our current monetary matrix we buy goods and services in exchange for money. No doubt, our utility bills and rent needs, as well as our need for recreation, all require real dollars to pay for what we hold value towards to feed the very basics of needs for food and shelter, and to foster building a quality of life. Today, with millions out of jobs, have we seen the providers of our goods and services rise to the occasion and seek ways to help?

We also believe that, today, these unsustainable systems of exchange are built on an unbalanced exchange for value that has perpetuated ruthless competition and greed that continues to have suppliers make choices that sacrifice providing quality ingredients. For example, solid clinical facts are available that tell us that using GMO derivative products like corn syrups and corn oils, as well as our suppliers who refuse to stop using hydrogenated oils while they may save pennies per item, and put more profit in the hands of our corporations, are dangerous to our health; contributing to rising healthcare costs, are dangerous to economic health, all compromising our general state of well-being, individually and collectively. These unnecessary choices are proven to create inflammation and destroy the balance of our body systems and cause dis-ease, all for the greed of the “almighty dollar” and for those rich CEO’s to call themselves a “success”.

When our Founder decided to give 50% of the net proceeds to Nutburger, in sharing this information with her co-creatorsin the process of manufacturing Nutburgers, she found that Nutburgersare a near complete food source that can actually feed hungry bellies across our planet. How exciting is this? We hope you’ll not only go Nutzzzz for Nutbugers™and help us co-create a new model for caring by posting, liking and Sharing Forward Nutburgers, but that you’ll share this new model for innerprize with your family and friends. In doing so, you participate by co-creating to a thriving new “US” bysharing forward a new model that rebuilds the bridges of trust, and truth, that our global family’s needsdo matter and that every heart and child matters. What we do to ONE, we do to ourselves.

What will our world look like when we see no walls that divide us and realize that in our hearts we are all the same?
SEA SALT

HEALTH BENEFITS:
There i s a substantial difference between the common processed table salt we buy in stores and the natural salt from our seas. Did you know that sea salt’s content of the oceans is similar to the salt content of our own blood?

Table Salt
The salt we normally use may come from salt mines or even from the sea. However, this so called "table salt" is a refined product, based on sodium chloride, that is used in so many industries, including the food industry.

The process of producing this “table salt” consists mainly in boiling and then drying the salt at high heat. The result is a substance hard on the body, that contributes to high blood pressure, heart trouble and kidney disease, among other health problems.

It often contains additives like aluminum that makes it powdery and porous. ("Aluminum is a toxic substance dangerous for the nervous system and it has been found to be one of the primary cause of Alzheimer's disease.")

Advocates of big industrial salt producers claim that sodium chloride as a chemical substance is the same as natural salt, and it's safe for the human consumption - but is it?
- It's exactly the same with so many other artificial foods sold to us (and labeled "natural") leading to so many health problems in our society today, including obesity and depression... And, to top it all off, we are being told by our health care “professionals” to stop our use of salt, actually robbing our bodies of one of the most important ingredients essential to our health and well-being.

Sea Salt
Whether collected from the sea, or salt mines, sea salt - in its the natural form - is a vital element for all living organisms including ourselves, with essential health benefits.
The statements below are not from my personal experience, although I like salt :) but they have been made by Dr. F. Batmanghelidj MD, the author of "You are not sick, you're thirsty!"
He explains all the important functions of the salt in our body and its huge importance for our health.

Water,Sea Salt, and potassium together regulate the water content of the body
Our daily food contains potassium from natural sources such as fruits and vegetables, but not table salt (sodium chloride). That’s why we need to supplement our daily diet with sale.

Here are only a few of the invaluable benefits of sea salt:
Sea Salt will reduce the High Blood Pressure
According to Dr. F. Batmanghelidj, by adding "good" salt to our diet, along with the other minerals and an appropriate hydration, salt will actually reduce the hypertension.
- The insufficiency of minerals in our body is actually the cause of water retention that causes the blood pressure.

Benefits of sea salt for Breathing

Dry Salt naturally soothes allergies, asthma and congestion
Dry salt inhaling is an old medical treatment for people with respiratory problems. It is called speleotherapy (or Halotherapy), because it's generally practiced in deep salt caves.
Salt has been always known as a strong antibiotic. A dry salt air inhaler will help cure bacterial respiratory infections and eases symptoms of asthma or allergies.
- Crystal salt lamps also improve the quality of air we breathe by generating negative ions

Benefits of Sea Salt for Sleeping

Salt can help you relax and fight insomnia.
Do you feel nervous, anxious or you have an agitated sleep?
Take a glass of water, drink it slowly and put some grain of salt on your tongue. This will calm you down and bring you in a relax mode.
If this happens at night it will help you fall into a good natural sleep.
*NOTE: the water should be at room temperature, so you don't shock your body.

Benefits of Sea Salt for the body pH Balance
In concert with water, salt will neutralize the acidity in the body, as well in the brain cells.
- If you want to prevent the Alzheimer's disease, you should not go on salt-free diet, or take anti diuretics for long.
- Kidneys will also benefit from less acidity passing into the urine Drinking Sea Salt water from salt springs also helps the digestive system and aids in the elimination of toxins.
- Researchers at Poznan University found that drinking sea water in small quantities can be beneficial to the health because of all the minerals it contains.
They give as an example the Native Americans from Utah, who used to drink water from the Great Salt Lake, to enhance the curative factors of their herbal remedies.

Benefits of Sea Salt for boosting the Immune System
Dr. F. Batmanghelidj MD also believes that salt is vital for the prevention and treatment of the cancer. Cancer cells - he explains- cannot leave in an oxygenated environment.
- When the body is well hydrated and salt expands the volume of blood circulation to reach all parts of the body, the oxygen and active immune cells in the blood reach the cancerous tissue and destroy it.
- Sea salt water and Sun work by activating the body's own healing mechanisms.

Benefits of Sea Salt for Skin
When bathing, sea salt also gives an antiseptic effect to the skin and reduces histamine that causes inflammation and itching sensation.
- Sea salt bath can be very efficient in eliminating the toxins from the body, while at the same time enriching the skin with vital minerals.

Benefits of Sea Salt for healthy gums and teeth
- Sea Salt makes the perfect mouth wash - you can use it to rinse your mouth after brushing or even as a more natural tooth soap, applied directly on the toothbrush. Use it in a 1% salt brine.

Benefits of Sea Salt for Healthy Eating
When we add salt to the food, our salivary glands are activated, giving us the necessary liquid that will dissolve the food, making it tastier and easier to swallow.
- Adding good quality natural salt to the food we eat is very important for digestion.

Benefits of Sea salt in Diabetes
Salt is a vitally needed element for diabetics.
- It helps balance the sugar levels in the blood and reduces the need of insulin.

Read more: http://www.health-benefit-of-water.com/sea-salt.html#ixzz29988mBT0
Read more: http://www.health-benefit-of-water.com/benefits-of-sea-salt.html#ixzz29978zOVP
OneTeam Humanity Foods
2618 San Miguel Drive, Suite 411
Newport Beach, CA  92660
(888) 989-6889 (NUTZ)
Fax: (949) 891-0468


 
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AVOCADOS
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TURMERIC
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SAGE
CAYENNE
CHILI POWDER
OMEGA 3/6’S
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50% OF PROCEEDS FEED HUMANITY
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